Rev. Charles Stanley, an Atlanta pastor, endorsed CBD and keto oil and gummies.

Context

This was the two false and a fraud. Scammers have been working with Stanley’s impression and likeness devoid of his authorization.

Rev. Charles Stanley, pastor emeritus for First Baptist Church Atlanta, has under no circumstances endorsed CBD gummies or oil, in spite of a persistent rumor identified on the web. Scammers appeared to first commence working with Stanley’s image and likeness in association with the goods with out his authorization back again in 2021. His title started to pattern with CBD gummies after again on July 22, 2022, in accordance to Google Trends.

In Contact Ministries, which is linked with Stanley, previously debunked the rumor on Fb in May perhaps 2021, declaring a pretend article designed to seem as if it arrived from the Fox News web page was likely around, and that “none of it is true”:

FactCheck.org, ChristianityToday.com, and other internet sites also published reporting that debunked this fraud.

Even though the rip-off with Stanley’s name very first started in 2021, there were being still a massive range of Facebook web pages in July 2022 that experienced names like, “Charles Stanley CBD Gummies.” These were established by scammers.

We earlier reported on a selection of other untrue statements from the world of CBD and keto gummies and oil. Phony celeb endorsements for these merchandise are absolutely nothing new. Some of our additional recent tales explained how the image and likeness of actor Rebel Wilson, Food stuff Community Television set host Ree Drummond, and “Family Feud” host Steve Harvey had been all remaining employed devoid of their authorization in purchase to thrust bottles of CBD or keto gummies. These three celebrities ended up just the idea of the iceberg, sadly.

We recommend viewers to be careful when clicking on any information that claims a superstar or other noteworthy person endorsed any particular products, gummies, or other comparable pharmaceutical solutions.

Sources:

Google Developments. https://traits.google.com/developments/.

“In Touch Ministries.” Facebook, 31 May perhaps 2021, https://www.fb.com/InTouchMinistries/.

Jones, Brea. “Posts Falsely Tie Evangelical Leader to Hashish Product.” FactCheck.org, 14 June 2021, https://www.factcheck.org/2021/06/posts-falsely-tie-evangelical-chief-to-cannabis-solution/.

Silliman, Daniel. “Charles Stanley: Not Advertising CBD.” Christianity Now, 8 June 2021, https://www.christianitytoday.com/news/2021/june/charles-stanley-cbd-fraud-gummies-oil-marijuana-hemp-false.html.